Sunday, July 31, 2016

Correspondence: J.H. Wilson, Chief of Cavalry Bureau, USA, to E.M. Stanton, Secretary of War, 1864

Correspondence: James H. Wilson, Chief of the Cavalry Bureau, Washington, to Edwin M. Stanton, 4 April 1864.
http://bit.ly/OR_1-32-3-JH-Wilson-to-EM-Stanton-1864

On April 4, 1864, J.H. Wilson, Chief of the Cavalry Bureau [since Feb. 1864] writes to E.M. Stanton, Secretary of War, discussing details and assignments of the mounted cavalry of the Department of the Cumberland (28 regiments cavalry; 7 regiments mounted infantry). He directs that certain regiments of several brigades "be mounted and equipped and returned to duty before any more new regiments are supplied" (255).

Regiments to be equipped:

FIRST DIVISION

First Brigade:
(1) Second Michigan Cavalry
(2) Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry

Second Brigade:
(1) Second Indiana Cavalry
(2) Fourth Indiana Cavalry
(3) First Wisconsin Cavalry

Third Brigade:
(1) Seventh Kentucky Cavalry
(2) First Tennessee Cavalry

SECOND DIVISION

First Brigade:
(1) Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry
(2) Fourth Michigan Cavalry
(3) Fourth U.S. Cavalry
(4) Fifth Iowa Cavalry
(5) Third Indiana Cavalry

Second Brigade:
(1) First Ohio Cavalry
(2) Third Ohio Cavalry
(3) Fourth Ohio Cavalry
(4) Tenth Ohio Cavalry
(5) Second Kentucky Cavalry

Third Brigade:
(1) Seventeenth Indiana Mounted Infantry
(2) Seventy-Second Indiana Mounted Infantry
(3) Ninety-Second Illinois Mounted Infantry
(4) One Hundred and Twenty-Third Illinois Mounted Infantry
(5) Third Kentucky Cavalry
(6) Eighth Iowa Cavalry

"The Second Michigan, Ninth Pennsylvania, Second Indiana, and First Wisconsin have all signified their willingness to re-enlist if they can be furloughed, but at present they cannot be spared from duty" (256).

Knoxville and Strawberry Plains: "...the cavalry was almost entirely used up, the horses almost starved to death..." (256).
6,000 - 9,000 horses required.
Arms: Spencer or Sharps carbine.

Special note concerning poor organization of certain Tennessee regiments; new order will override plans of Governor [Andrew] Johnson [Military Gov. of Tenn., 1862-1865] who was in process of requesting that these inferior regiments be equipped. [Later in the doc., and explanation appears to be that new Tennessee units are forming, but will be untrained, inferior to veterans]. Regarding Tennessee cavalry:

"Regarding the efficiency of these Tennessee regiments there is but one opinion. With the exception of the First Tennessee, they are all worthless" (256).

(In March): Cavalry, Dept. of the Ohio, concentrated at Louisville, Kentucky.

Plans for direct communication between generals commanding the Cavalry Bureau is submitted (duties of officers, recuperation of horses, rations, surplus stores, arms, return of horses from citizens, discourage use of mounted infantry, etcetera). [See text].

Criticism of Colonel Wolford (under General Schofield).

Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 3, Chp. 44 (Correspondence, Etc.--Union) [Washington: Government Printing Office, 1891], 255-258 [Wilson to Stanton: Washington, 4 April 1864].

Short URL: http://bit.ly/OR_1-32-3-JH-Wilson-to-EM-Stanton-1864

Full Citation (general info, for series).

Subjects: Cavalry, Condition of Cavalry, Starvation, Army of the Cumberland, Organization of Army

Sherman to Thomas (Correspondence, April 1864) Organization of Army. Furloughed Veterans Recalled.

Correspondence of William T. Sherman to George H. Thomas, April 1864: Organization of the Army of the Cumberland, with Discussions of Cavalry (Furloughed Veterans Recalled) and Corps (Plans for Placement of Three Wings, Cleveland, Chattanooga, and Stevenson):

On April 6, 1864, Major-General William T. Sherman writes from Headquarters, Military Division of the Mississippi, to Maj. Gen. Geo. H. Thomas, Comdg. Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, advising him of changes in Thomas's command. Furloughed veterans are retained. Hovey's Division of 5,000 infantry will move to the Hiwassee River, relieving the previously detached Fourth Corps. Thomas will have complete control of the army. His left will be Cleveland [Tennessee], his Center will be Chattanooga, and his right will be Stevenson [Alabama]. He discusses communication routes (Nashville to Columbia [Tenn.]). Reserve mounted-cavalry positions for the best men.

Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 3 (Correspondence, Etc.--Union), Chp. 44, 271-272 (Sherman to Thomas, Nashville, 6 April 1864).
http://bit.ly/OR_1-32-3-Sherman-to-Thomas-1864-army-organization

Col. Eli Long enters west Cohutta Springs, Murray County, Georgia (North Georgia) - Feb. 1864

This bit of correspondence is significant to my very specific research project, but might be of interest to anyone who is studying the First Battle of Dalton, Georgia, or wanting to know more about North Georgia.

When Colonel Eli Long first entered Murray County, Georgia, en route to the Battle of Dalton, he seemed a bit confused about the location, or at least realized that the orders concerning his mission were ambiguous on a certain point: the location of the roads.

Colonel Eli Long camps at the mill near Waterhouse's Plantation
Long camps at Waterhouse's Mill in Cohutta Springs (west), Murray County, Georgia, February 1864.
http://bit.ly/OfficialRecords-I-32-1-Eli-Long-Rept-26

Citation: Reports of Col. Eli Long, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, commanding Second Brigade, Second Cavalry Division, Correspondence: Long to Whipple, 22 Feb. 1864, Near Burnt Mill, On Cleveland and Spring Place Road," Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 1, Report 26.

Report of Brig. Gen. Charles Cruft, U. S. Army, commanding First
Division, Fourth Army Corps, Rept. No. 3., O.R. Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 1 (Reports), Ch. 44 ("Demonstration on Dalton, GA"), [Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1891], 423.
https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth152618/m1/442/

Link to a text file of the same communication. Caution! Has errors.
http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/m/moawar/text/waro0057.txt

THE FOLLOWING SECTION WAS UPDATED SEPT. 7, 2016, TO SHOW THAT F.R.R. SMITH WAS CAPTURED IN OR NEAR MURRAY COUNTY, NOT ATLANTA. HE HAD MAPS OF ATLANTA, BUT WAS, AT THE TIME OF CAPTURE, MAPPING AN AREA THAT DESCRIBES PART OF MURRAY COUNTY, GEORGIA.

Captain F.R.R. Smith, Confederate Engineer, Captured (probably near Conasauga River); and Captain Herman, almost captured while mapping near Conasauga River.
Two months after Eli Long entered North Georgia, two Confederate engineers were found mapping areas in northern Murray County, Georgia. One of them, F.R.R. Smith, was captured. "Captain Smith says he was ordered to make a survey of the country south of Sumac Creek, west of the Federal road, east of Connesauga Creek, and north of Spring Place" (341-342). He had also made maps of Atlanta. The other one, Captain Herman, who was almost captured, "was evidently making a survey of the country south of the Connesauga River, west of the Federal road, north of Sumac Creek" (341).

It makes me think that there may not have been any detailed maps of the area at the time Eli Long was there. There was a map in draft stages (Map: Mountain Region of North Carolina and Tennessee, which I've cropped to show details of Murray County, Georgia. It wasn't published until 1865, but had two earlier drafts, also on file at Library of Congress). Ref.:  O.R., s1, v32, pt3, 341-342 (McCook to Whipple, 13 April 1864, Cleveland, Tenn.).
Note: The area that the Rebels are mapping, from the description given in this correspondence, only makes sense if it is understood that the portion of the Federal Road mentioned therein refers to the north fork of the Federal Road. The road forked at Ramhurst and went north into Murray County. The other fork went on toward Dalton. Find a description of the route on Georgia USA website.
Eli Long's correspondence is from a Burnt Mill near the Conasauga River. He camped at a nearby house, which he later identified as Mr. Waterhouse's house. Other soldiers identify the camp site as Waterhouse's Mill, which seems more likely. None of the correspondence mentions Cohutta Springs, but a post office existed near that area as early as 1836. It was suspended during the war and re-opened later. Interestingly, it does not appear on the 1865 map that I've found, but does appear on earlier and some later maps of the area. On the 1865 map, Cohutta Springs (the mineral springs) near Summerour, east of Waterhouse's, is designated, but the Cohutta Springs P.O. is not designated. Very importantly, for anyone studying the area: these are really two separate communities, but they are both called Cohutta Springs (or Cohutta Springs P.O.) at various times, and sometimes actually appear in two spots on the same map. The old Waterhouse plantation is west of Sumac Ridge, in the Tenth District, 3rd Section, of Murray County (five miles west of the mineral springs), on modern-day Georgia Highway 225. The mineral springs were east of Sumac Ridge, north of Hickory Ridge, off of modern-day U.S. Highway 411. See my detailed description and maps.

Report: F.R.R. Smith captured. Captain Herman, almost captured mapping near Conasauga River.
Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 3 (Correspondence, Etc.), [Washington: U.S. Govt. Printing Offc., 1891], 341-342 (McCook to Whipple, 13 April 1864, Cleveland, Tenn.).
http://bit.ly/I-32-3-FRR-Smith-captured

Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 3
Title: The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies
Compiled by: Calvin Duvall Cowles
Contribrs: United States. War Records Office, United States. Record and Pension Office, United States. Congress. House.
Publisher: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1891
Original from the University of Virginia; digitized Feb 1, 2008

Also see:

1865 MAP - Detail of Northern Murray County, Georgia (Mountain Region Map of North Carolina and Tennessee (detail of N. Ga.), Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division).
The page above has my research and comments about Cohutta Springs, Waterhouse's Plantation, etc.


Full biblio: The War of the Rebellion: v.1-53 [serial no. 1-111] Formal reports, both Union and Confederate, of the first seizures of United States property in the southern states, and of all military operations in the field, with the correspondence, orders and returns relating specially thereto. 1880-1898. 111v.

1865 Map: Detail of Cohutta Springs, Murray County, Georgia (North Georgia)

1865 MAP - Northern Murray County, Georgia (detail from LC Map, Mountain Region of North Carolina and Tennessee).

Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division
Mountain Region of NC and Tenn (dtl, North Georgia area)
This map shows Cohutta Springs as being east of Sumac Ridge. That is the location of the mineral springs and resort area. West of the ridge, but not designated on this 1865 map, is Cohutta Springs P.O. (est. 1836), suspended briefly during the Civil War. Some old maps show both locations as "Cohutta Springs."

For anyone researching this area, here are points to help identify the locations: 

(1) Cohutta Springs (P.O., west of Sumac Ridge) is associated with Col. Eli Long, Callaway Campbell, Euclid Waterhouse (Waterhouse's Mill, Waterhouse's house, later McCroskey's); the locale can be identified by land deeds in the Tenth District, 3rd Section, Murray County; by Callaway Campbell's description of the post office as being five miles west of the mineral springs of the same name (from letters in a collection at William and Mary College); and by the proximity of the Conasauga River (see the area south of Benton Pike, where the Conasauga River goes down and crosses the Tenn/Georgia line before curving to the west). The modern location would be on Georgia Highway 225 N, Crandall, Georgia, just before crossing the state line into Tennessee.

(2) Cohutta Springs (historic mineral springs, resort, east of Sumac Ridge, north of Hickory Ridge, in the mountainous area at the foot of Grassy Mountain) is associated with Alexander Stephens, vice president of the Confederacy, who once stayed there; and with Myra Inman of Cleveland, Tennessee, who summered there in the early days of the Civil War. (Myra identified the location as two miles from Summerhour's). It is in or near the 27th District, Second Section, Murray County. It can also be identified by an old advertisement by Dr. W. A. Hooten, placing the mineral springs at the foot of the Cohutta Mountains, 18 miles east of Dalton; by descriptions in other diaries (Wadley or Watkins, as I recall), which describe the boarding houses near the springs. The ruins of cabins and hotels are in the woods near the end of Cohutta Springs Road, Crandall, Georgia, as is the chimney of the old Cohutta Springs Mill (later known as the Coffey Mill). The modern-day location is accessed from U.S. Highway 411, and is located on Cohutta Springs Road, Crandall, Georgia, near the dead end of it.

(Above map is a cropped area of a larger Mountain Region map of North Carolina and Tennessee).

Citation for full map view:
Nicholson, W. L, A Lindenkohl, H Lindenkohl, Charles G Krebs, and United States Coast Survey. Mountain region of North Carolina and Tennessee. [S.l., U.S. Coast Survey, A. D. Bache, Supt, 1865] Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress [Geography and Map Division], https://www.loc.gov/item/99447196. (Accessed July 04, 2016.)

Map Drafts, 1863-1864, are available from same source. Published 1865.

ALTERED FROM ABOVE MAP, TO SHOW APPROX. LOCATION OF COHUTTA SPRINGS POST OFFICE AND WATERHOUSE'S PLANTATION ("W"), WEST OF SUMAC RIDGE. IN THE MOUNTAINOUS AREA IS COHUTTA SPRINGS, THE MINERAL SPRING AND RESORT AREA:




LATER MAP, SMALLER AREA, SHOWING COHUTTA SPRINGS P.O. WEST OF SUMAC RIDGE. THIS MAP IS PROBABLY 1906-1910; THE RAILROAD (BUILT 1906) SHOWS ON THE FULL MAP:



Black Confederate Soldiers (link to blog)

Black Confederate Warriors of Dixie
http://blackconfederates.blogspot.com/
(link to blog)

A project of Pop's Southern American
The Southern Co-Op

I haven't used this site in research, but happened across it in a search. It looks like a well-written blog which seeks to research and publish the history of a forgotten and disrespected group of soldiers whose history, like all soldiers and citizens, should be remembered and told.


Rawlingsville (Obsolete Town), Fort Payne, Dekalb, Alabama (History), with References to Saltpeter

Saltpeter works in Rawlingsville, Alabama

According to these local-history sources, the salt works at Rawlingsville were destroyed September 5, 1863. I did find a reference to that in the summary of one volume of Official Records, but then, could not find in the reports where they actually destroyed the works on that date. They just mentioned being in Rawlingsville. In other reports in Official Records, I found references to the destruction of salt works in Rawlingsville on February 5, 1864, not September 1863.
LINK TO MY BLOG POST WITH REFERENCES TO OFFICIAL RECORDS, DESTRUCTION OF SALT WORKS AT RAWLINGSVILLE, ALABAMA, FEB. 5, 1864

Local References for Destruction of Salt Works in Rawlingsville, Alabama, on September 5, 1863. 

History of Dekalb County, Alabama, with Description of Rawlingsville
Rawlingsville is now part of northeastern Fort Payne, Alabama. According to this site, on September 5, 1863, a Federal Cavalry detachment destroyed a saltpeter works at Rawlingsville.
http://www.discoverlookoutmountain.com/history-county-courthouses.shtml

Landmarks of Dekalb County, Alabama
Gives the date for the destruction of the saltpeter works at Rawlingsville as September 5, 1863.
http://www.landmarksdekalbal.org/history/DeKalbHistory.html

The web pages above have descriptions of Rawingsville (historic, obsolete place name in Dekalb County, Northern Alabama). The little Alabama town or community of Rawlingsville is no longer extant (or rather, cannot easily be located on modern maps). The town is mentioned in Civil War correspondence and memoirs, such as History of the First Tennessee Cavalry Vols, by W. R. Carter. The Union army destroyed a saltpeter works at Rawlingsville during the crossing of Sand Mountain and Lookout Mountain in September 1863. The sites include a history of Dekalb County, Alabama.





Towns, places, obsolete place names, non-extant places, locating old towns, Alabama towns, Chickamauga Campaign, Crossing Lookout Mountain, Crossing Sand Mountain, Salt, Saltpeter Works


Major General James Scott Negley, by Major Keith A. Barclay (thesis, link)

 Major General James Scott Negley and His Division at Chickamauga: A Historical Analysis
(PDF, 136 pages)

Major Keith A. Barclay
U.S. Army Command and General Staff College
B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania, 1989


[THESIS: 136-PAGE PDF DOWNLOADS AUTOMATICALLY WHEN YOU CLICK ON LINK. ]
http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA395223


Thesis Subjects: General James Scott Negley, The Chickamauga Campaign

Lee and Gordon's Mill (link)

Lee and Gordon's Mill (History, Summary)
http://roadsidegeorgia.com/site/leeandgordonmill.html

History of Lee and Gordon's Mill, near Chickamauga, Walker County, Georgia. Site of importance in the Chickamauga Campaign, the Chattanooga Campaign, and the Atlanta Campaign. Dates of particular significance include summer and fall of 1863 (September - November 1863).

Chattanooga Campaign, Battle of Chattanooga (link)

American Civil War: Chattanooga
via AmericanCivilWar.com
http://americancivilwar.com/statepic/tn/tn018.html

Summary, Description, Organization: The Chattanooga Campaign, Battle of Chattanooga

Link: Chattanooga

Henry Albert Potter Collection, via Seeking Michigan (selected links)


Henry Albert Potter Diary (if deep link works)
Seeking Michigan has the document images, but seems to have removed the links for browsing the Civil War database. Path for this link: from the main page, search "Henry Albert Potter."
http://seekingmichigan.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/search/searchterm/henry%20albert%20potter/order/nosort

Seeking Michigan: 
Search Result for "Henry Albert Potter Diary"
http://bit.ly/Henry-Albert-Potter-Diary-srch

Henry Albert Potter Diary: Link to the Entry about Sgt. Crotty's Horse.
http://seekingmichigan.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p129401coll15/id/5563

Henry Albert Potter Diary, Feb. 8, 1864
General Thomas and Cleveland, Tennessee, entry
http://bit.ly/SeekingMichigan-Henry-Albert-Potter-Diary-Feb-8-1864

1863-12-24 Letter from Henry Albert Potter
December 24, 1863 Potter Letter Page 1
MS 91-480 Henry Albert Potter Collection
http://seekingmichigan.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p129401coll15/id/2032
http://seekingmichigan.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p129401coll15/id/2032/rec/10


Webpage of Potter's Descendant
This person's mother donated the diaries; he has additional information and some transcripts.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mruddy/Chicka.htm

This is a great Civil War Collection, including digitized images of original letters and diaries of Lieutenant Henry Albert Potter of the the 4th Michigan Cavalry (B, E, H).

For my project, it is particularly important because he was at Charleston, Tennessee, in 1864, and has written first-hand accounts of the camp and courier duty there, including a mention of a skirmish at Cleveland, Tennessee. He is associated with Col. Eli Long's division. He has a wonderful description of a North Georgia thunderstorm (at Villanow).

The Seeking Michigan site is not quite as easy to navigate since it removed the main link to the Civil War Documents collection, but the site has a search tool. The Potter collection has many more items than the selected ones I've listed here.

A Hundred Battles in the West (Thatcher) (link)

A Hundred Battles in the West: St. Louis to Atlanta, 1861-1865. The Second Michigan Cavalry
Full-Text Version, at Archive.org
https://archive.org/details/ahundredbattles00thatrich


Detailed, first-hand story of the organization, movements, actions, and experiences of the Second Michigan Cavalry Vols, by Marshall P. Thatcher (link to digitized version of book, via Archive.org). This book is central to my story, so I check it often. For anyone working on The Army of the Ohio, The Army of the Cumberland, the Battles of Boonville, The Atlanta Campaign, and similar subjects, it's a very good source. For anyone working on Michigan Cavalry units, specifically, the Second Michigan Volunteer Cavalry, I think it's an indispensable source. It's also just a good story, for anyone who likes Civil War non-fiction. The author was a soldier in the Second Michigan.



Chickamauga (WikiPedia article, quick lookup)

The Battle of Chickamauga (Wikipedia)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Chickamauga

Pioneer Brigade, Michigan Pioneers (links) and First Michigan Engineers

Pioneer Brigade: Rosecrans' Hand-Picked Engineers
Geoffrey L. Blankenmeyer's page
http://www.thecivilwargroup.com/pioneer.html


The Liberty Rifles: Pioneer Brigade 
Cody J. Harding's page
http://www.libertyrifles.org/research/pioneerbrigade.html

Links to nice article about Rosecrans' famous Pioneer Brigade (hand-picked engineers).

The Pioneers were to travel with the advance of the army, while the 1st Michigan Engineers, a similarly hand-picked unit of engineers, would focus on communications, supply lines, etc. One mention of the First Michigan Engineers is in the vignette of "an unidentified orderly seargeant, 21st Michigan," in Echoes of Battle: The Struggle for Chattanooga (Baumgartner and Strayer, 1996), which contains a bare mention of Private Adrian Musty of Co. D, 1st Mich. Engineers, assisting in the crossing of the Tennessee River at Brown's Ferry in October 1863:

[Quote from Echoes of Battle, 192]:

"One pontoon in midstream was struck by Confederate Artillery fire, the shell penetrating the boat's bottom and letting in a gush of water. Private Adrian Musty of Company D, 1st Michigan Engineers, quickly pulled off his blouse and cap, stuffed them into the hole and prevented the boat from sinking until it could be repaired."(192).

Baumgartner, Richard A. and Larry M. Strayer, Echoes of Battle: The Struggle for Chattanooga, (Huntington: Blue Acorn Press, 1996), 192 (in vignette/caption of An unidentified orderly sergeant, 21st Michigan).
______________________

Louis A. Simmons, in The History of the 84th Reg't Ill. Vols., mentions the Pioneer Brigade, and says that the pontoon bridge at Bridgeport, Alabama, was actually two bridges, because the Tennessee River is there divided by an island (pg. 77).
Pontoon Bridge at Bridgeport, Alabama
http://bit.ly/84th-Ill-Vols-p77-pontoons-at-Bridgeport-AL



First Battle of Dalton (link)

First Battle of Dalton Article, Daily Citizen news
http://www.daltondailycitizen.com/news/local_news/civil-war-anniversary-the-battles-for-dalton-feb--/article_570f0d57-60c1-54e1-bcba-a9796657e1aa.html

The Battles of Dalton, Georgia (February 1864 and May 1864) aren't as famous as other battles, so most of what's found on it is from local sources. There weren't as many casualties as in other battles. The first battle was not a Union success. The second battle was not exactly a Union win, but did serve as a diversion in a "flanking" strategy...

This link is to a Daily Citizen newspaper article about the First Battle of Dalton, in February 1864.


Winston's Gap, Lookout Mountain Crossing, Campbell, McCook, etc. (Congressional Serial Set, search result)

War of the Rebellion ("Official Records")

War of the Rebellion ("Official Records")

Volume 30:
Volume XXX (in four parts).
Part I (Part 1) Reports (Aug. 11-Sept. 22, 1863).

Chapter XXXII (Chapter 32):
              Operations in Kentucky, Southwest Virginia, Tennessee, Mississippi, North Alabama, and North Georgia. August 11-October 19, 1863.

Page x: Contents of the Preceding Volumes. (This is a handy list w/volume number, chapter number, and description of each of about five preceding volumes; handy when you're trying to figure out where to find a report). The current volume "chapter" description is basically, "page 1-1031." To get a breakdown of it, I guess you'd look in the subsequent volume, i.e.--vol. 33 will have a breakdown of reports, by page number, that are found in volume 32. (In other words, they had to wait till each volume was printed to know what page a report fell on). The following is incomplete--just a couple of reports I've used myself...

Volume 30:
Page 3: Summary of the Principal Events.
        This has a description of the subsections of the volume (but without page references), which include the Raid on the Mississippi Central Railroad, the Skirmish at Big Black River Bridge, Miss., and the Chickamauga Campaign, among other sections. My most recent research includes The Chickamauga Campaign, so many of my sources relate to it.

Reports I've cited:

Page 5: No. 1 Report of Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, U. S. Army, with instructions to Col. Edwin F. Winslow.
Headquarters Fifteenth Army Corps,
Camp on Big Black, September 5, 1863.

Page 47: No. 3 Report of Maj. Gen. William S. Rosecrans, U. S. Army, commanding the Army of the Cumberland.
[October --, 1863.]

        (Page 54, still in Rosecrans's report, has the Winston's Gap segment).





Also found in:

Congressional Serial Set w/Multiple Reports by A.P. Campbell, E.M. McCook, and Others
The Chickamauga Campaign, Crossing Lookout Mountain, Winston's Gap, etc.
Via Google eBooks; shortened URL: http://bit.ly/OR_Winstons-Gap-search

This link is specifically a search for Winston's Gap, but the book can be searched for related events and subjects, such as Lookout Mountain, McCook, skirmish, etc.

Official Records (The War of the Rebellion) (link to all, via Cornell University)

The War of the Rebellion: a Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies: Full Text Copies of All 128 Volumes, Presented by Cornell University
http://ebooks.library.cornell.edu/m/moawar/waro.html

Author: United States. War Dept.
Title: The War of the Rebellion: a Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies
Other Title: Official records of the Union and Confederate armies
Publisher: Government Printing Office
Place of Publication: Washington
MoA Volumes: Series I, 1-53; Series II, 1-8; Series III, 1-5; Series IV, 1-4 (1880 - 1901)


I have to use Official Records all the time, and I love finding the full books online, with the original images. Unfortunately, this site may limit access, or prevent links. I find that sometimes the link won't work (internal server error). It could be because I've called on the source too many times, or it could be that they don't like deep links to their site. Try it. If it works, it's worth a mint!


20th Corps (XX Corps), Alexander M. McCook, source (link)

20th Corps (McCook's)
The Civil War Archive, Union Corps Histories, "20th Corps (McCook's)." 

[citing "Regimental Losses in the American Civil War (1861-1865)" - William Fox] [The Civil War Archive 1998-2000; page updated 04 Aug. 2001] 
http://web.archive.org/web/20050318195432/
http://www.civilwararchive.com:80/CORPS/20thmcc.htm

Link to source: Alex M. McCook, XX Corp (Twentieth Corps), Union Army

Summary, Biography, History, Fact Check, Army Organization

Role of Union Cavalry in the Atlanta Campaign, The: Robert Blake Leach (link)

The Role of Union Cavalry in the Atlanta Campaign
Major Robert Blake Leach 
Master's Thesis, University of Kentucky, 1980; pub. Ft. Leavenworth, 1994.
http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a284554.pdf

I go back to this thesis quite often and have used it as a source. It is a helpful summary and is easy to read (clear, well written). Among other things, it makes a significant point about technological advances during the Civil War, which began to impact the traditional role of cavalry.

Role of Union Cavalry in the Chickamauga Campaign, The: John J. Londa (link)

The Role of Union Cavalry in the Chickamauga Campaign
Major John J. Londa
Master's thesis,  United States Military Academy, 1978; pub. Ft. Leavenworth, 1991.

PDF - 149 PAGES. AUTOMATIC DOWNLOAD WHEN YOU CLICK ON LINK!
http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a241432.pdf

This source contains a further breakdown of Stanley's Cavalry Corps, into two divisions of three brigades each, with several officers pertinent to my own Civil War project; namely, A.P. Campbell, E.M. McCook, and Eli Long. Two other officers, Watkins and Lowe, are less often mentioned in my particular sources). See pages 22 and 24 for organization charts.

So far, I've only skimmed this one, but I usually find these thesis papers helpful. I'm no expert, so I can't vouch for the quality of the research or anything. Take it on its own merit.

Civil War Bookmarks (unproofed)


My Civil War Bookmarks

(Straight cut-and-paste, not double-checked)
Tenn - Union Cavalry

Scouts, spies, & heroes

Civil War Records

Adjutant Gen-Archives

Old MICHIGAN Book

5 - Sherman Burns Confederate Hopes

Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 3, (from search result for: April 4, 1864 and sherman and schofield and thomas)

Congressional Serial Set - Google Books

Shermans March 1864 Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Shermans March 1864

Bridge-Burning in Tennessee, 1861

Autumn of Glory: The Army of Tennessee, 1862-1865 - Thomas Lawrence Connelly - Google Books
old MICHIGAN book

War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0535 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION. | eHISTORY

L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, <a target="_blank" onclick="openPopupWindow(this); return false" href="entityvote?doc=Perseus:text:1999.01.0001&auth=moore,henry,w.&n=1&type=person

History of Hillsdale county. Michigan, with ill...

Civil War in the Mountain South
Struggle for a Vast Future: The American Civil War - Google Books

danielcreager.com/BookOfCreager/Third Edition for Electronic Media.pdf

Record of service of Michigan volunteers in the ... v.32. - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library | HathiTrust Digital Library

Catalog Record: Record of service of Michigan volunteers in... | Hathi Trust Digital Library

The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union And Confederate 
Armies. Series 1, Volume 32, In Three Parts. Part 3, Correspondence, etc., Page: 100 | The Portal to Texas History

1st Georgia Infantry (USA)

MS 67-111: Frank L. Vogel Collection <br /> Diary of John Vogel :: Civil War Manuscripts

Newspaper 1861 (Civil War): Second Regiment, MIchigan Cavalry. Bay City Press & Times / Bay-Journal.com

History of the Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry: Three Months and ... - James Birney Shaw - Google Books

History of the Michigan Organizations at Chickamauga, Chattanooga and ... - Charles Eugene Belknap - Google Books

www.chickamaugacampaign.org/pdfs/AlpineGeorgia.pdf

Congressional Series of United States Public Documents - Google Books

Minty and the Cavalry: A History of Cavalry Campaigns in the Western Armies - Joseph G. Vale - Google Books

PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHIES OF THE GOVERNORS OF MICHIGAN, AND OF THE ... - Google Books

Our Trust is in the God of Battles: The Civil War Letters of Robert Franklin ... - Robert Franklin Bunting, Thomas W. Cutrer - Google Books

Congressional Serial Set - Google Books

Military Record of Civilian Appointments in the United States Army - Guy Vernor Henry - Google Books

The War of the Rebellion: v.1-53 [serial no. 1-111] Formal reports, both ... - United States. War Dept, Henry Martyn Lazelle, Leslie J. Perry - Google Books

The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. ; Series 1 - Volume 32 (Part III)

marshall historical society marshall mi - Google Search

Civil War anniversary:The Battles for Dalton Feb. 24-26 and May 7-12, 1864 | Local News | daltondailycitizen.com

National Park Civil War Series: The Battes for Chickamauga

Major General Alexander M. McCook, USA: A Civil War Biography - Wayne Fanebust - Google Books

N.GA CWmaps

Civil War Bookmarks (unproofed)


My Civil War Bookmarks

(Straight cut-and-paste, not double-checked)
Tenn - Union Cavalry

Scouts, spies, & heroes

Civil War Records

Adjutant Gen-Archives

Old MICHIGAN Book

5 - Sherman Burns Confederate Hopes

Official Records, Series 1, Vol. 32, Pt. 3, (from search result for: April 4, 1864 and sherman and schofield and thomas)

Congressional Serial Set - Google Books

Shermans March 1864 Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Shermans March 1864

Bridge-Burning in Tennessee, 1861

Autumn of Glory: The Army of Tennessee, 1862-1865 - Thomas Lawrence Connelly - Google Books
old MICHIGAN book

War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0535 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION. | eHISTORY

L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, <a target="_blank" onclick="openPopupWindow(this); return false" href="entityvote?doc=Perseus:text:1999.01.0001&auth=moore,henry,w.&n=1&type=person

History of Hillsdale county. Michigan, with ill...

Civil War in the Mountain South
Struggle for a Vast Future: The American Civil War - Google Books

danielcreager.com/BookOfCreager/Third Edition for Electronic Media.pdf

Record of service of Michigan volunteers in the ... v.32. - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library | HathiTrust Digital Library

Catalog Record: Record of service of Michigan volunteers in... | Hathi Trust Digital Library

The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union And Confederate 
Armies. Series 1, Volume 32, In Three Parts. Part 3, Correspondence, etc., Page: 100 | The Portal to Texas History

1st Georgia Infantry (USA)

MS 67-111: Frank L. Vogel Collection <br /> Diary of John Vogel :: Civil War Manuscripts

Newspaper 1861 (Civil War): Second Regiment, MIchigan Cavalry. Bay City Press & Times / Bay-Journal.com

History of the Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry: Three Months and ... - James Birney Shaw - Google Books

History of the Michigan Organizations at Chickamauga, Chattanooga and ... - Charles Eugene Belknap - Google Books

www.chickamaugacampaign.org/pdfs/AlpineGeorgia.pdf

Congressional Series of United States Public Documents - Google Books

Minty and the Cavalry: A History of Cavalry Campaigns in the Western Armies - Joseph G. Vale - Google Books

PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHIES OF THE GOVERNORS OF MICHIGAN, AND OF THE ... - Google Books

Our Trust is in the God of Battles: The Civil War Letters of Robert Franklin ... - Robert Franklin Bunting, Thomas W. Cutrer - Google Books

Congressional Serial Set - Google Books

Military Record of Civilian Appointments in the United States Army - Guy Vernor Henry - Google Books

The War of the Rebellion: v.1-53 [serial no. 1-111] Formal reports, both ... - United States. War Dept, Henry Martyn Lazelle, Leslie J. Perry - Google Books

The war of the rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. ; Series 1 - Volume 32 (Part III)

marshall historical society marshall mi - Google Search

Civil War anniversary:The Battles for Dalton Feb. 24-26 and May 7-12, 1864 | Local News | daltondailycitizen.com

National Park Civil War Series: The Battes for Chickamauga

Major General Alexander M. McCook, USA: A Civil War Biography - Wayne Fanebust - Google Books

N.GA CWmaps